This Day in Rock History

April 8th 1975

If you were alive on this day, you must have had a devastating existence up to this point. You would have lived without hearing Tom Hamilton’s hypnotizing bass line in “Sweet Emotion.” And you wouldn’t have even thought of humming Brad Whitford’s and Joe Perry’s bluesy guitar riff after hearing a friend tell you to “Walk this Way.” You would have lived without Aerosmith’s Toys in the Attic.

Since this is Aerosmith’s third studio album, you (still working in the understanding that you’re hypothetically alive in the 1970s) would have at least had a chance to hear Aerosmith, even though their first album, the eponymous Aerosmith, achieved little commercial success. It is unimaginable today that an album with the Classic Rock staple, “Dream On” was once widely unknown. For their second album, Get Your Wings, Aerosmith brought in a new producer, Jack Douglas. He continued to produce their albums up until the 1979 album Night in the Ruts. Their second album was more successful than the first. Get Your Wings reached 74 on the Billboard charts in 1974, and when listening to this album in comparison to the first, one can tell that this album is closer to the signature Aerosmith sound known today. However, there was still room for Aerosmith to move up the charts and gain recognition.

Commercially, their third album was more successful than their previous two. Toys in the Attic peaked at number 11 on the Billboard charts in ’75. They also had success with their singles, “Sweet Emotion” and “Walk this Way.” In the Billboard Hot 100, “Sweet Emotion” reached 36 in 1975, and “Walk This Way” reached #10 in 1977, giving the world two classic guitar riffs to hum when inspiration strikes.  The album has grown in its success and influence since its initial release. It even led to their comeback in 1986 when Joe Perry and Steven Tyler collaborated with Run D.M.C in their cover of “Walk this Way.” According to the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the album has since sold 8 million copies, making it an 8x Platinum record. Today, the album is available in many different mediums than were initially available. What are you waiting for? Go ahead and dust off your old record player, break out your classic CD player, or even look into more popular mediums like Spotify or an eight-track player. 220px-Aerosmith_-_Toys_in_the_Attic

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